Top five spring hikes at Yosemite National Park

Mist Trail
One of the most popular trails in the park, the Mist Trail passes two of Yosemite’s famous waterfalls, Vernal Fall and Nevada Fall. In the spring this trail earns its name when it comes close enough to the waterfall to douse hikers with spray. Bring a rain-coat and prepare to get wet! Also, keep your eyes open for rainbows (spraybows) when the sun hits the mist at just the right angle. If the water seems chilly, the open granite slope at the top of Vernal Fall is a great place to soak in the sun and dry out a little.

Lower Yosemite Fall and Upper Yosemite Fall
Lower Yosemite Fall is a 1.1 mile loop across from Yosemite Lodge at the Falls. It follows a paved trail, perfect for strollers, to a bridge at the base of lower Yosemite Fall. In spring, when the water fall is at its largest, mist from the Lower Fall blows out over the bridge, leaving hikers feeling like they are on the bow of the Maid of the Mist.

Upper Yosemite Fall Trail is not a continuation of the Lower Fall loop. Instead, this (7.2 mile round-trip) trail starts behind the Camp 4 Campground, and climbs steadily to Columbia Point which provides a birds-eye view of Yosemite Valley.

Mirror Lake/Meadow – Snow Creek Trail
A relatively flat one-mile hike from bus stop #17, Mirror Lake packs a lot of scenery into a short walk. Not only is it located below the iconic Half Dome, but during the spring months, the meadow fills with water to form a shallow lake reflecting the near-by cliffs, including Mount Watkins.

Chilnualna Falls
Yosemite Valley doesn’t hold the monopoly on great spring hiking. The Chilnualna Falls trail in Wawona is 8.2 miles round-trip, and relatively steep, but rewards hikers early on with views of roaring cascades, and a variety of wildflowers along the trail.

Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias
The Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias is a must-visit destination in any season. A visit to the most massive trees on Earth, trees that were already ancient when the Roman Empire fell just shouldn’t be missed.

There is an interpretive sign that says that Giant Sequoias need a lot of water. You may not be able to see that evidence if you visit in summer or autumn, but a spring hike through the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias quickly illustrates that point. Sequoias seem to thrive in low places where water collects or runs.

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(Photo: Theresa Ho)

—By Yosemite Park

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